Auditions: "A Christmas Carol: A Live Radio Play"


Scrooge 

Ebenezer Scrooge?! Oh, no, Spirit, no! Hear me! I am not the man I was! Why show me this if I am past all hope? Your nature intercedes for me, and pities me. Assure me that I yet may change these shadows you have shown me, by an altered life. Good Spirit, tell me that I can change these dreadful shadows you've shown me! I'll honor Christmas in my heart and try to keep it all the year. I'll live in the past, present and the future. The Spirits of all three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach. Oh, tell me I may sponge away the writing on this stone! I beg you, Spirit! I beg you! (Weeping, in a whisper.) I promise you, Spirit... I have learned... I beg you... (Beat. Opening his eyes, seeing where he is.) What...? Where...? Can it be? Is this not my bedpost? Am I in my own bed? I am! My bed curtains are not torn down, here they are, rings and all! (Laughing and crying in the same breath.) I don't know what day of the month it is. I don't know how long I've been among the Spirits. I don't know anything. I'm quite a baby. Never mind. I don't care. I'd rather be a baby. Heaven and Christmas be praised!


Belle and Young Scrooge

BELLE
Ebenezer, dance with me!

YOUNG SCROOGE
Can't you see I'm busy?

BELLE
(Softly.) I matter little to you, very little. Another idol has replaced me.

YOUNG SCROOGE
What idol has replaced you?

BELLE
A golden one. (Gently.) There is nothing which gives you such passion as money.

YOUNG SCROOGE
Dear Belle, that's not fair.

BELLE
I'm afraid it is. When we were engaged, we were both poor.

YOUNG SCROOGE
Was it better then? Better to be poor?

BELLE
Better, at least, to be happy. You are changed. You were another man then.

YOUNG SCROOGE
(Impatiently.) I was a boy! You blame me because I've grown wiser? Have I ever tried to break our engagement?

BELLE
In words? No. Never.

YOUNG SCROOGE
In what, then?

BELLE
In a changed nature; in an altered spirit. In everything that made my love of any value in your sight. So I release you
from your promise.

YOUNG SCROOGE
Belle!

BELLE
Oh, at first, it may cause you pain to lose me -- a very brief pain. But soon it will be dim, like a half-remembered
dream -- an unprofitable dream. And you will be glad to be awake from such a dream. May you be happy in the life you
have chosen, Ebenezer...

YOUNG SCROOGE
Belle! Don't go...


Bob Cratchit and Mrs. Cratchit

BOB CRATCHIT
And now, dear family, a toast to Mr. Scrooge, the founder of the feast!

MRS. CRATCHIT
The founder of the feast indeed! I wish I had him here. I'd give him a piece of my mind to feast upon, and I hope he'd have a good appetite for it.

BOB CRATCHIT
My dear, the children. Christmas Day.

MRS. CRATCHIT
It should be Christmas Day, I am sure, on which one drinks the health of such an odious, stingy, hard, unfeeling man as Mr. Scrooge. You know he is, Robert. Nobody knows it better than you do, poor fellow.

BOB CRATCHIT
(Mildly insisting.) My dear, Christmas Day.

MRS. CRATCHIT
I'll drink his health for your sake and the Day's, not for his. Long life to him. A merry Christmas and a happy new year! -- He'll be very merry and very happy, I have no doubt!


Fred and Fred's Wife

FRED
(Laughs.) He said that Christmas was a humbug! He believed it too.

FRED'S WIFE
(Indignantly.) More shame for him, Fred.

FRED
He's a comical old fellow, that's the truth. Not as pleasant as he might be, but his offenses carry their own punishment, and I have nothing to say against him.

FRED'S WIFE
I'm sure he is very rich, Fred. At least you always tell me so.

FRED
What of that, my dear? His wealth is of no use to him, for he does no good with it. (Laughing under the following.) And I assure you he has no such plan to benefit us with it!

FRED'S WIFE
Laugh as you will, but I have no patience with him.

FRED
Oh, I have.

FRED'S WIFE
Why ever so?

FRED
I am sorry for him. I couldn't be angry with him if I tried. Who suffers by his ill whims? Himself, always. Here, he won't accept our invitation to come and dine with us. What's the consequence? He loses a dinner.

FRED'S WIFE
(Interrupting.) Indeed, he loses a very good dinner.